Ferraris Surprise AZ

Ferrari’s latest offering, the California, uses the template of the latest-generation SL: a folding-hardtop convertible and a transmission that does without a clutch pedal.

Ferrari Alternative Service & Repair
(602) 404-7347
2020 E Bell Rd
Phoenix, AZ
 
Ferrari Alternative Service & Repair
(602) 404-7347
2020 E Bell Rd
Phoenix, AZ
 
Ferrari Alternative
(602) 404-7365
2020 E Bell Rd
Phoenix, AZ
 
Car Company Inc Sullivan
(480) 610-9016
310 S Nina Dr
Mesa, AZ
 
Niece Equipment
(602) 258-1937
2101 S 15th Ave
Phoenix, AZ
 
Ferrari Alternative
(602) 404-7365
2020 E Bell Rd
Phoenix, AZ
 
Scottsdale Ferrari
(480) 991-5322
6825 E Mcdowell Rd
Scottsdale, AZ
 
Desert Auto Plex
(602) 795-3214
17410 N Cave Creek Rd
Phoenix, AZ
 
Mister Auto Sales
(602) 443-7850
1316 Grand Ave
Phoenix, AZ
 
Lou Grubb Chevrolet
(623) 975-5000
9055 W Bell Rd
Peoria, AZ
 

2009 Ferrari California vs. 2009 Mercedes-Benz SL63 AMG

2009 Ferrari California vs. 2009 Mercedes-Benz SL63 AMG By Michael Austin

For 54 years while Jaguars, BMWs, and Cadillacs have come and gone, the Mercedes-Benz SL has been the king of the trophy-car convertibles—the sort of car that not only says its owner has arrived but that he’s been around for a while.


Ferrari’s latest offering, the California, uses the template of the latest-generation SL: a folding-hardtop convertible and a transmission that does without a clutch pedal. Ferrari is positioning the California as a less expensive companion to the 599GTB and 612 Scaglietti grand tourers, leaving the mid-engined F430 to represent the harder-edged realm of Ferrari’s sports-car ambitions. So the overlap in price—the California’s base price of $197,350 is only $22,810 less than the convertible F430 Spider’s—isn’t supposed to be a problem, but some sales cannibalization is to be expected.

Also inevitable are comparisons with other cars in the segment, even if potential owners more likely cross-shop their purchases with helicopters or gold-plated hovercraft. This brings us to the Mercedes-Benz SL63, recently updated for 2009 with revised styling, a new (for the SL) 6.2-liter V-8, and a shift-time-hastening multiplate clutch (in place of a torque converter) between the engine and the seven-speed automatic transmission. The SL65 AMG, which starts at $198,175, might be closer in price to the Ferrari, but the maniacal power of its twin-turbo V-12 and the extra heft over the front wheels in the SL65 make the SL63 a more manageable and enjoyable car to drive. Read the entire article at Car and Driver.com!

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