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2011 BMW M6 Mandan ND

The M6 lies at the intersection of supercar, GT and sports coupe. It brings performance and styling cues from all three segments to create a car that is unlike any other on the market, and as such, will only appeal to a very specific – and very affluent – group of consumers.

Ressler Chevrolet Inc
(701) 663-9851
1500 2nd St NE
Mandan, ND
 
Valley Imports Inc
(701) 277-1782
West Fargo, ND
 
Budget Auto Sales & Service
(701) 252-1552
1011 10th St SE
Jamestown, ND
 
Ryan GMC
(701) 852-1026
3805 S Broadway
Minot, ND
 
Northland Truck Sales
(701) 281-8223
1006 2nd
West Fargo, ND
 
Ressler Subaru
(701) 663-8223
805 E Main St
Mandan, ND
 
Cen-Dak Truck & Trailer Sales
(701) 252-0057
800 23rd St SW
Jamestown, ND
 
Luther Family Ford
(701) 282-2350
3302 36th St S
Fargo, ND
 
Forks Freightliner
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4200 Gateway Dr
Grand Forks, ND
 
Hatton Ford Inc
(701) 543-3636
909 Railroad Ave E
Hatton, ND
 

2011 BMW M6

January 13, 2010   By Brian Alexander, Road Test Editor
2010 BMW M6 2010 BMW M6

2010 BMW M6
DriverSide Overview
Attempting to figure out just what exactly the BMW M6 is can prove a daunting task. Is it a supercar? It’s a bit too heavy, slightly too luxurious and just a hair slow to qualify by today’s frankly ridiculous standards, so no, it’s not a supercar. Is it a GT, a stately luxo-barge used for long, comfort-filled hauls across entire states or countries? Well, it’s a little too stiffly sprung and a bit too manic, so no, it’s not a GT. So it has to be a sports coupe, right? Again, it falls a bit off mark, being too large and heavy to be considered a modern sports coupe. BMW has the M3 for that.

2010 BMW M6


2010 BMW M6


2010 BMW M6
Instead, the M6 lies at the intersection of supercar, GT and sports coupe. It brings performance and styling cues from all three segments to create a car that is unlike any other on the market, and as such, will only appeal to a very specific – and very affluent – group of consumers. Within the stately shell of the 6-Series lies an M-inspired interior with deep sports seats, ahead of which sits an engine that appears to have been snagged from a Formula One parts crate and an automated manual gearbox that feels a bit antiquated in today’s market. It’s a fun car to say the least, but just what exactly it defines itself as, we can’t say for sure.

Watch our Video Review

What's to Like

The manic power delivery of the M6 is highly addictive, and above 6,000 rpm the engine is terrifyingly rampant, delivering a Formula One howl unlike anything else in the segment. Inside, it’s very luxurious, with an array of available leather choices and all the tech one could hope for.

What's Not to Like
When the M6 was released, BMW’s SMG automated manual transmission may have been at the top of its game, but today much better technologies exist (including BMW’s own M DCT) and the SMG feels too jerky and unpredictable for daily use. The rear seats are absolutely useless and fuel economy is painfully poor around town. Paying a $3K gas-guzzler tax is never fun.

The Drive:
DriverSide Driving Impressions

While the top-heavy powerband of the M6 doesn’t feel like anything special around town – if you’ve every owned a five-cylinder engine you will notice an induction note that’s immediately familiar – find an empty stretch of road (or, preferably, racetrack) where you can pin the throttle and you’ll discover it hides its magic above 6,000 rpm, at which point it slams you back in your seat on the way to its surreal 8,000 rpm redline. With the M button activated, it’s good for 500 horsepower, and it feels like every single one of them subsists exclusively on Red Bull. Chassis feedback isn’t at the level of say, an M3, and grip levels are so high that you won’t...

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