Auto Broker Olympia WA

In the following article, you will find some useful advice about what a car broker can do for you when selling your used car. So read on to get more detaied information.

Harpers Auto Sales
(360) 753-0200
8401 Old Highway 99 SE
Olympia, WA

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Park It Market Incorporated
(360) 459-7275
6504 Martin Way E
Olympia, WA

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Carey Motors
(509) 248-1500
3204 Fruitvale Boulevard
Yakima, WA
Services
Radiator Repair,Tune up Repair,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Hahn Motor CO
(509) 453-9171
1201 S 1st Street
Yakima, WA
Services
Clutch Repair,Radiator Repair,SUV Repair,Tune up Repair,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Lynnwood Dodge
(425) 771-2255
20612 Highway 99
Lynnwood, WA
Services
Clutch Repair,Radiator Repair,Tune up Repair,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Sundance Auto Sales
(360) 956-1830
2400 Carriage Loop SW
Olympia, WA

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Southwest Auto Sales
(360) 709-9272
9809 Blomberg St SW
Olympia, WA

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Maxs Service Center
(509) 476-2581
2002 N Main Street
Oroville, WA
Services
Electrical Repair,Mufflers Repair,SUV Repair,Used Car Dealers

Valley Toyota Inc
(509) 575-4868
914 S 1st St
Yakima, WA
Services
Clutch Repair,Radiator Repair,Used Car Dealers

Cash For Cars
(206) 440-7200
18200 Hwy 99
Lynnwood, WA

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Introduction to Auto Brokering

Introduction To Auto Brokering By Issac Bouchard, DriverSide Contributor

Just what is an automotive broker? He or she basically serves as a "buyer's agent," helping to arrange every part of the vehicle transaction and watching out for the best interests of the client.

The three major parts of this are the finding and securing of the appropriate new or used car , truck or SUV ; shopping any trade-in to maximize its value; and arranging the finance or lease package.

If someone has enough time, they can do much of this for themselves. However, the bottom line is that dealers negotiate hundreds of deals per month, and normal folk do it on average every three to four years.

A professional broker does enough volume per month to negotiate discounts through the fleet departments of new car franchises, and can make sure the savings are large enough to cover their fee and still be a great deal for their client. Since they work in the business on a daily basis, they are often intuitively aware of changes in the market and how they can affect people. Not just at purchase , but when it's time to trade-in as well.

Finally, because a broker isn't employed by a specific manufacturer (yet can obtain most any type of car or truck), their first interest is in what vehicle is most appropriate for their client. Top auto brokers are good enough to work exclusively on a repeat and referral basis.

To Trade Or Sell?
The Internet is a wonderful tool for helping find a new vehicle; you can compare features and prices, even negotiate your purchase price. But the plot thickens when you have a car or truck to trade-in. The retail asking prices you'll find when looking to gauge your vehicle's value can be misleading. Not only do they represent what the seller wants for their ride - as opposed to true market value - they also don't necessary take into account such variables as color and options, and most especially condition.

Complicating matters is that there is more than one bluebook. NADA and Kelley are the two big ones, yet the same vehicle routinely varies thousands of dollars between the two. Make sure you're looking at the one used in your region of the country.

There is no way to really know the condition of most vehicles without seeing them in the metal and taking them for a drive. Even experts in the wholesale side of the business miss things. And services like CARFAX are no substitute.

Trade It In Or Sell It Yourself?
The biggest determinate for most folks on whether to trade is tax law in your particular state. For example, in Colorado, buyers pay sales tax on the net difference between what they are buying and what they are turning in.

As a simple comparison, let's imagine your trade is worth $17,500 if sold retail through the paper, and the most a dealer would offer on trade was $15,500. Yet, at a 7.5% sales tax rate (pretty typical nationwide), the sales tax savings would be $1162.50: almost half the difference. ...

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